This is a work of fiction. All of the names, characters, places and events portrayed in this novel are either products of the author’s imagination or, if real




НазваThis is a work of fiction. All of the names, characters, places and events portrayed in this novel are either products of the author’s imagination or, if real
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Zombies Versus Witches:

A FREE Halloween Poem

By Rusty Fischer, author of Zombies Don’t Cry


Copyright © 2012 by Rusty Fischer

All rights reserved.


This is a work of fiction. All of the names, characters, places and events portrayed in this novel are either products of the author’s imagination or, if real, are used fictitiously.


Cover credit: © davidevison – Fotolia.com


Zombies Versus Witches


Each year as Halloween did fall

Upon the town of Mercy;

A curse befell the little town

Yes, Mercy was quite curse-y.


You see, the townsfolk, years ago

Had wronged the local witch;

And so each year upon the day

She came back with a hitch.


She rode her broom

To the town square;

And when the folks

Had gathered there…


She hit them with

The same decree:

Your fairest child

You must give to me.”


And with the witch

The child must go;

Though where they went

No one must know.


They only knew

From that day on;

The child she took

Was forever gone.


But this year as

The day drew near;

The town folk grinned

From ear to ear.


For they had hatched

A cunning plan;

To rid the witch

From their fair land.


They sent a girl, Elizabeth,

To the zombie side of town;

And there the little Liz set out

To hunt one zombie down.


She came upon a boy named Zed

Who was quite decomposed;

His flesh was gray, his teeth were green

He smelled like old potatoes.


Liz said to Zed, “I need your help.”

Zed grunted, “Tell me why.”

Liz started to explain herself

Then broke down in a cry.


Zed hated to see Liz upset

And patted her warm shoulder;

She saw that Zed was taken in

And got a little bolder.


Liz led him back to Mercy town

And brought him to the square;

The town folk gave a sniff or two

And left him standing there.


Liz went and hid behind a bush

And told Zed there to wait;

And so he stood, and got into

A meditative state.


As darkness fell and moonlight dawned

Zed felt a little chill;

The wind picked up and all around

The air grew rather still.


He heard a cackling far above

And watched the witch descending;

She circled round and back again

Here descent was never ending!


Finally the witch touched down

And stood in front of Zed;

She looked him up and down and said,

They sent the living dead.”


Zed shrugged and held his hand out to

Make the introductions easy;

But the witch pulled back and looked at him

As if he was quite sleazy.


How dare you shake your hand at me?”

The witch told Zombie Zed.

I’d rather boil in candy corn

Than touch the living dead.”


Zed stood there in his coffin tux

His hair all filled with worms;

He thought that maybe witchy-poo

Was just afraid of germs.


She sneered and scratched the wart upon

Her green and twisted nose;

And then she pinched the corn upon

Her purple, peeling toes.


She looked around the city square

For a fair human kid;

And seeing none, the witchy fumed

And almost blew her lid.


She said to anyone around

And all within her earshot,

That she would curse the lot of them

Starting with the dead rot.


What does that mean?” poor Zed exclaimed.

As he shrunk back in fear.

The witchy cackled and then said,

It means you’re toast, my dear!”


And so the witch did witchy things

With lots of talk and smoke;

She yelled and shrieked and spelled until

The tip of her wand broke!


And finally she had enough

Of trying to curse Zed;

And that was when she looked at him

And this is what she said:


They were smart, to bring you here

Into the city square;

Because my spells are lost on you

They drift into the air…


You see, my friend, my spells are meant

For people who are living;

I guess the living dead are not

Hurt by the spells I’m giving.”


And so at last Zed understood

Why they had brought him here;

And why the witch who once was bold

Frowned straight from ear to ear.


And so the witch got on her broom

Never to return;

And all the townsfolk gathered round

As Zed to them did turn.


Why thank you Zed,” said Little Liz

As she grabbed his cold hand.

I’m glad I chose you here to come

And rid the witch from our fair land.”


He squeezed her hand and shook her hair

And then turned to the crowd.

He sniffed and smelled and that was when

His stomach growled read loud.


I’m glad that I could rid your town,”

Said Zed unto the townsfolk;

Of that mean old witch

But now it’s time that I spoke…”


You see, I never work for free,

In fact, I’m rather greedy;

And that is why it’s time for you

To pay for being so needy.”


The townsfolk grumbled all about

They were rather ungrateful;

And Zed decided his demands

Before they turned quite hateful:


Now don’t you fret

Now don’t you mind;

I will not put you

In a bind…”


All I want,

My human friends;

Is what begins

Where your spine ends.”


And when the townsfolk

Scratched their heads;

Zed used his body

Language instead.


He grabbed a skull

And started munching;

And then another

He was crunching.


And when old Zed

Had had his fill;

He told the crowd

That they could chill.


Look at it this way,”

Old Zed said;

Now you have your own

Living dead…


And if the witch comes back again

They’ll be immune to her;

And so you’ll never have to come

And give me a job offer…”


And Zed went back from where he’d come

Into his crypt so chilly;

He thought that everyone in town

Had acted rather silly.


Now the witch had gone away

And would come back no more;

And so he’d chomped a few noggins

But who was keeping score?


The town folk had their children back

And now were all quite happy;

And Zed crept back into his tomb

Feeling rather sappy.


Okay, his price was rather steep

But what would they like instead?

A town with no fair children left

Or a couple… living dead?


About the Author:

Rusty Fischer





Rusty Fischer is the author of Zombies Don’t Cry, as well as several other popular zombie books, including Panty Raid at Zombie High, Detention of the Living Dead and the Reanimated Readz series of 99-cent living dead shorts.

Rusty runs the popular website Zombies Don’t Blog @ www.zombiesdontblog.blogspot.com. At Zombies Don’t Blog you can read more about Rusty’s work, view his upcoming book covers and read – or download – completely FREE books & stories about… zombies!

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