Lesson 2: Introduction to Bronx Masquerade




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Lesson 2: Introduction to Bronx Masquerade


Context: The students have been working on their poetry units. They have discussed figurative language and started to create their own poems. This is the first day I will be teaching the students, and we are beginning our unit on the Bronx Masquerade.


Objectives:

Short-Range Objectives:

  • Students will be able to define the word “Masquerade” and research the “Bronx” in the title of the novel in order to predict what the novel will be about.

Long-Range Objectives:

  • Students will be able to make predictions about the novel by analyzing and researching the meaning behind words in the title of any text they read.

Rationale

Administrators: This lesson is important because it enhances the students’ understanding of titles. Titles are never random or hastily slapped onto the front cover of a novel they are chosen by authors to represent a key idea or theme in the text. Students will also enhance their prediction skills.


Students: Not only will this lesson enhance the students’ ability to predict, but this lesson will help to focus the students researching skills. Groups will be assigned an area to become experts on and teach to the class.


Critical Pedagogues: Students need to be able to form understandings on their own. This lesson is important because students need to learn how to explore and discover. It also allows the students to have a sense of responsibility because they need to choose facts to share with fellow students.


Background Knowledge and Skills

Students must have basic understanding of poetry and of guessing.


Standards

NYS ELA Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding.

  • Students make distinctions about the relative value and significance of specific data facts and ideas.





Summary:

I will begin class informing the students that we will be beginning our unit on the Bronx Masquerade. I will pass out the novels and then get into the lesson on prediction. I will split the students into four groups and assign roles. Each group will need to research one of the following: Location, Population, History, and Culture of the Bronx. Also each student will need to look-up masquerade. As a class, we will share our Top Five Facts of each category, and I will make a class list of definitions for masquerade. For homework, students will be asked to choose one of the class definitions of “masquerade” and create an illustration that visually represents it: drawing, sketch, collage, painting, etc. They must include the term and the definition. These will be posted around the room to remind us as we begin the novel.


Procedure

Anticipatory set

  • Take attendance

  • “Hi everyone! Today we are going to begin our unit on the Bronx Masquerade. I’m going to hand out the novels, but before I do let me split you into groups for our activity.”

  • Split the students into 4 groups. If groups are too large, just double the categories.

  • DIN


5 min

Instruction

  • Hand out novels.

  • Go over National Poetry Month and the assignments for the month.

  • “So before we begin reading let’s take a look at the title. Titles are never random or hastily slapped on a book right before it goes to the presses. Instead, authors carefully choose titles to represent a key idea or theme in the novel—just like the title of a song or a painting or a poem. Before we dive into Nikki Grimes’ novel Bronx Masquerade, we can analyze the title to make predictions about what the novel might be about, the theme.”

  • “A theme is the main idea of an essay, paragraph, or book. The message could be about life, society, human nature, love, etc. They are the underlying truths within the story. What do we think about the definition of prediction? Yes a prediction is a forecast or guess of the events to come. We form predictions based on details we collect.”



10 min

Guided Practice:

  • “Alright as a class, let us try to predict what this book will be about. What is the title? Yes, Bronx Masquerade, so we will be researching and analyzing these words more in depth to try and figure out what the novel will be about. Masquerade, what do you think it is? What do you know about this word already? The Bronx is an area, a borough, of NYC. In order for us to find out more about this location, your group will be assigned these research categories: Location, Population, History and Culture. I want you to create a Top Five Facts to share with the rest of the class. Begin.” Students will also be sharing their definitions of masquerade, and I will be compiling a class list of definitions for the term.

  • Give the students ten minutes to research and choose five facts on their category.


10 min

Independent Practice

  • Students will be presenting their findings to the rest of the class while others take notes.

  • Now that you have an understanding of the terms in the title, let’s put them together and consider what they could mean side-by-side. Brainstorm what the title might tell us about the novel. What could the characters be like? What does the setting look like? What kind of events might occur? Remember, you’re not just guessing, you’re predicting—that means you’re coming up with educated possibilities that you can support with your research or personal knowledge. You’ll have the chance to share and discuss your ideas with the class.



18 min

Closure

  • Remind students of homework.

  • Collect classwork

  • “For homework, the students must choose one of the class definitions of “masquerade” and create an illustration that visually represents it. You can create a drawing, sketch, painting, or collage—be creative! On your illustration, however, you must write out the term and the selected definition. We’ll post these around the room so we can keep them in mind as we start and read the novel.”


2 min



Special notes and Reminders to myself

-Mind the time

Materials and Resources needed

-Markers and blackboard

-Worksheets

Accommodations for Students with Special Needs

Assessment of Student Learning

-Students participation will be taken into account.

Reflection on or Evaluation of Lesson


Name:______________________________ Date:________________

Period___________


NYC Fact Packet


Location: Where exactly is the Bronx?


  • New York City is the largest city in the United States.

It is located in the southern part of New York State, at the mouth of the Hudson River

(also known as North River as it passes Manhattan Island).


  • In 1898, when Greater New York was chartered, the city expanded to include the following five

boroughs, which are also counties in New York State: Manhattan (New York County); Brooklyn (Kings County); Bronx (Bronx County); Queens (Queens County); and Staten Island (Richmond County).




  • Bronx [brongks ] northernmost of the five boroughs of New York City,

located on the mainland with the Harlem and Hudson rivers to the west,

Westchester County to the north, Long Island Sound to the east,

and the East River to the south.


Population: Who lives there?


  • According to the National Census Bureau in 2008, the population of NYC, NY was 8,308,163 people.

44.6 percent White, 25.1 percent Black or African American, 11.8 percent Asian, and the rest of the population is mixed.


  • Each of New York City’s boroughs has a large population, important businesses and industries, and

many fine educational and cultural institutions. Within the five boroughs are more than 100 neighborhoods, such as Manhattan’s Chinatown, Greenwich Village, and Harlem. These neighborhoods are not official government units. They have similar types of housing or people with similar backgrounds or lifestyles.


  • The people of NYC represent nearly all nationalities. During the 1650’s, only about 1,000 people lived

in the Dutch colony of New Amsterdam on Manhattan Island. But even then, 18 languages were spoken in the colony.


History of the Bronx:


  • The indigenous Lenape (Delaware) American Indians were progressively displaced after 1643 by

settlers from the Netherlands and Great Britain. The Bronx received many Irish, German, Jewish and Italian immigrants as its once-rural population exploded between the mid-19th and mid-20th centuries. They were succeeded after 1945 by African Americans and Hispanic Americans, together with immigrants from the Caribbean — especially Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and Jamaica. In recent years, this cultural mix has made the Bronx a wellspring of both Latin music and hip hop.

  • At the end of World War I, the Bronx hosted the rather small 1918 World's Fair at 177th Street and DeVoe Avenue. The Bronx underwent rapid growth after World War I. Extensions of the New York City Subway contributed to the increase in population as thousands of immigrants flooded the Bronx, resulting in a major boom in residential construction.



  • The Bronx, particularly the South Bronx, saw a sharp decline in population, livable housing, and the quality of life in the late 1960s and the 1970s, culminating in a wave of arson, but has shown some signs of revival in recent years.

Culture: How do people live? What do people do for entertainment? Music? Art? Food? Literature?

  • The Bronx is the home to Yankee Stadium.

  • The Bronx is also known as the birthplace of Hip-Hop and Latin music. The Bronx is referred to in hip-hop slang as "The Boogie Down Bronx", or just "The Boogie Down.” Newer hip hop artists from the Bronx include Swizz Beatz, Drag-On, Fat Joe, Terror Squad and Corey Gunz.

  • The Bronx Zoo is located in the Bronx.

  • Across the Harlem River, is the Apollo theatre, Broadway, Central Park, and many diverse neighborhoods.



After reading the article, choose the TOP FIVE FACTS to share with others. What is it you think is the most important information about NYC and the Bronx area that may help us to better understand the novel?


1.___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2.___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

3.___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

4.___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

5.___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________




Lesson 3: Discrimination and Choices


Context: This unit is about tolerance. The students have been introduced to some main themes and issues that may arise in the novel as well as in their own lives. We have made predictions based on information collected by the title and we will begin reading the novel today.


Objectives:

Short-Range Objectives:

  • Students will be able to discuss and define discrimination, social expectations, innocence, maturity, and preconceived judgments.

  • Students will be able to list several different choices that young adults make and identify their good and bad consequences.

Long-Range Objectives:

  • Students will be able to write several self-expressive short narratives about issues with identity and discrimination to develop a class anthology.


Rationale


Critical Pedagogues: This lesson will help the students to expand their vocabulary and become introduced to terms and ideas perhaps unfamiliar to them. In this globalizing society, students need to be not only literate, but they need to be culturally relevant individuals. This lesson will expand their knowledge of the society they live in.


Background Knowledge and Skills

Students must have basic understanding of categories and must have a basic understanding of text-self connections.


Standards

NYS ELA Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and understanding.

-As listeners and readers, students will analyze experiences, ideas, information, and issues presented by others using a variety of established criteria. As speakers and writers, they will present, in oral and written language and from a variety of perspectives, their opinions and judgments on experiences, ideas, information and issues. 

Summary:

I will begin class with the DIN for the day. I will ask students to respond to a short paragraph and describe Luis and what they learned about him. I will then discuss the term characterization with them and point out how writers use actions, thoughts, and dialogue to tell what a character is like. I will then inform the students that we will begin reading the novel today. I will quickly reiterate the things we covered previously. I then will instruct the students to define to the best of their ability these words: discrimination, social expectations, innocence, maturity, preconceived judgments. Answering what it means to them? How it makes them feel? What does it look like?(Example) After briefly discussing those concepts the students will brainstorm choices that young adults make and the consequences both good and bad. We then will begin reading the novel out loud.


Procedure

Anticipatory set

  • Take attendance

  • Focus students to answer the DIN

  • Review the DIN and ask students what they learned about Luis.

  • Go over the homework assignment(Read 1-23, answer journal question)


5 min

Instruction

  • Instruct students to put everything away, have one person from each table collect the homework and put it in the tray, handout worksheets

  • “Today we are beginning to read the novel. Monday we discussed some general themes that young adults may face, yesterday we researched the title to predict what the novel would be about, and today we are jumping into the story. But before we do, I want you to quickly brainstorm the definitions to the following words.

  • Present the terms to the class and ask them to take five minutes to try and define them in their own words and write everything about them. We will discuss some of the terms together. Inform students that we will return to these terms throughout the reading.

  • “Without even knowing it, we as humans characterize and categorize people on a daily basis. Sometimes we make judgments on others based on their outer appearances and actions before we know anything about them.”



12 min

Guided Practice:

  • “Coinciding with these concepts, everything we do in life is a choice, and every choice we make has consequences. Sometimes good and sometimes bad. Let’s make a list of all the possible choices and consequences (good and bad) that young adults make. Think about choices regarding school, out of school, family, etc.”

  • Give students examples and then discuss

  • “ As we begin reading the novel, we will be writing several journal entries relating the novel to the world and to ourselves. Since we just discussed choices and their consequences, your first journal entry is to write about a time you made a decision, good or bad, and explain how it changed you. Be specific. Explain what it was and how it changed you.” (Handout)


16 min

Independent Practice

  • Begin reading the novel.



10 min

Closure

  • For homework, students will need to read the first 23 pages of the novel.

  • The students will also need to write a personal journal entry on the topic of choices and consequences.


2 min



Special notes and Reminders to myself

-Mind the time

Materials and Resources needed

-Powerpoint

-Worksheets

Accommodations for Students with Special Needs

Assessment of Student Learning

-All work is graded classwork is ten points.

Reflection on or Evaluation of Lesson


Lesson April 14th: What’s in a Name?


Context: The students have been reading the Bronx Masquerade. During this unit, the students will be writing and reading poetry. Many of the students can find at least one character in the novel to relate to. At the end of the novel, we will be publishing our own “Syracuse Masquerade.”


Objectives:

Short-Range Objectives:

  • Students will be able to deconstruct the Sandra Cisneros “My Name” in order to create a narrative about their own name.

  • Students will be able to compare themes from “My Name” to Zorro poem in Bronx Masquerade.

Long-Range Objectives:

  • Students will be able to compare and contrast the difference between their peers experiences and their own by reading and writing and publishing their writing.

  • Students will be able to utilize reading comprehension skills, I.e setting, character, detail, point of view in order to write a compare/contrast essay about a character or characters in the novel and themselves.


Rationale

This lesson is important because students will be able to relate to the reading by reflecting on their own names and identity. Students will also be gaining skills that will help them to read and comprehend any text they read.


Background Knowledge and Skills

Students must have read the assigned reading to complete the assignment to the best of their ability.


Standards

NYS ELA Standard 3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation.

  • Evaluate examples, details, or reasons used to support ideas.

  • Use prewriting activities (e,g, brainstorming, note taking, freewriting, outlining, and paragraphing)


Summary:

I will begin class with the DIN for the day. I will give the students 7 minutes to complete and review the DIN. The DIN will be asking the students to name three characters from in the novel read so far from page 1-64 and state an issue he or she faces. After the DIN and the discussion of the novel so far, I will ask the students to ponder and discuss the significance of names and whether or not it relates to his or her identity. Students will then be instructed to grab a textbook and we will read “My Name” by Sandra Cisneros as a class. I will be pausing throughout the reading to ask reading comprehension questions to make sure that the students are understanding what she is saying. I will then ask the students to answer two brief questions summarizing and analyzing the reading. We then will also look at Raul’s situation in Bronx Masquerade and discuss his issues. Class work grade will be their responses to the reading. For homework, I will ask the students to write about their names and how their names describe who they are. I will hand out a pre-writing assignment and if time allows, students will be given time in class to begin working on their drafts.


Procedure

Anticipatory set

  • Take attendance

  • DIN on characters in the novel

  • What do you think about the situations that some of the characters are facing in the novel so far? Do you think the book accurately portrays some of the issues that adolescents face? Even though the characters are from all different backgrounds and ethnic groups. What is one stereotype that Raul Ramirez faces….yes identity and trying to make a name for himself in the world he wants others to see him as an excellent painter and not some just see him for his ethnicity.

  • Clear desks get textbook


7 min

Instruction

  • I will be asking the students some leading questions to start a discussion about names.

  • Some questions:

  • “In what way does your name describe who you are?”—a sense of who we are and where we belong

  • “Have you ever thought of changing your name?”--- it’s your identity, witness protection programs change names=change identity.

  • Sometimes there are stories behind our name, inherited.

  • Turn to page 9

  • Brief background history of Sandra Cisneros

  • Begin reading with the students, pausing to ask comprehension questions.





12 min

Guided Practice:

  • I will ask students to complete questions 1 and 4. Asking the students to summarize and analyze the message in the short story. I will only give them five minutes to do so.

  • I will return to Raul’s issue and go through the Zorro poem and how he is trying to make a name for himself.

  • After brief discussion, I will ask the students to think about their own names and tell them that for homework tonight I would


20 min

Independent Practice

  • I will give the remainder of the period to the students to work on their name pieces. They must complete the pre-writing and then begin the writing section. I will tell the students that I will collect both tomorrow.



4 min

Closure

  • Tell the students to put their answers in the tray on their way out the door.


2 min



Special notes and Reminders to myself

-Mind the time

Materials and Resources needed

-PP presentation

-Worksheets

-Textbooks

Accommodations for Students with Special Needs

Assessment of Student Learning

-Students participation will be taken into account.

-Class work will be worth 10 points.

-Daily DIN is 5 points

-Homework is 10 points.

Reflection on or Evaluation of Lesson


Name:_________________________________ Date:___________

Period:____________


My Name: Pre-writing Activity


What is the origin of your name?__________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________


What does your name mean? __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


Are you named after anyone?_____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________


Do you look/act/speak like anyone you are named after? If so, how?

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


How does your name make you feel? __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


What is one word your friends use to describe you?__________________________


What is one word you would use to describe yourself?________________________


What thing do you love most in this world? __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


If your name was put in a song, would the song be fast or slow? What kind

of song would it be? _____________________________________________________________________________


What is your birth sign? Do you fit it? Why or why not? (ex. Leo, Gemini) __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


If you could change your name, what name would you give yourself? ____________________________________________________________________________

Lesson April 26th: Body Image


Context: The students have been reading the Bronx Masquerade. Many of the issues that the teenagers in the novel are facing relate to the issues that real-life teenagers are facing. Some of the issues deal with stereotyping, body image, and school. During this unit, the students will be reading and writing their own poetry, as well. They will also be discussing some of the specific issues in more detail.


Objectives:

Short-Range Objectives:

  • Students will be able to read the article “Body-image Obsession is not solely the domain of teenage girls” and discuss the positive and negative body image affects on young girls and boys.

  • Students will write a journal entry about body image.

Long-Range Objectives:

  • Students will be able to incorporate issues from the novel into their own personal compare/contrast essays.

  • Students will be able to express their own similar issues paralleled with the novel into their poems and/or narratives.


Rationale

This lesson is important because students are reading a non-fiction article that relates to their life and connecting it to the article. Students will reflect on the ways the media helps to portray certain images to young adults and they will be able to critically analyze how each gender is affected.


Background Knowledge and Skills

Students must have read the assigned reading to complete the assignment to the best of their ability.


Standards

NYS ELA Standard 1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding.

Students compare and synthesize information from different sources.

Students relate new information to prior knowledge and experience.


Summary:

I will begin class with the DIN for the day. I will give the students 5 minutes to complete and review the DIN. The DIN will be asking the students to choose a better word for plain words: good, a lot, pretty, nice. After the DIN, I will ask the students to clear their desks except for their quick write journals and a pen. I will read out loud “Stranger” by Myers and connect it to self-image issues in Bronx Masquerade. I will then read a line from the novel that Tyrone says on page 64 and ask the students to quickwrite to the question “Do you think girls, and guys for that matter, ever satisfied with the way they look? Why or Why not?” We will discuss and then the students will also read a new article about teen body obsession and discuss how the way we see ourselves affects the way we are seen by others. We will also discuss both positive and negative body image affects of the media.

Procedure

Anticipatory set

  • Take attendance

  • DIN on better word choice.\

  • I will hand out the Vocabulary Packet and let the students know that this will be due Monday. I will give instructions.


10 min

Instruction

  • I will ask the students to clear their desks except for their quickwrite journals and a pen.

  • I will read an excerpt from the short story “Stranger” or a poem about body image to the students and ask them questions connecting the text to image issues in Bronx Masquerade. We will briefly discuss some of the character body issues (Example: Devon must stay lean, Diondra doesn’t like her height, Wesley Tough guy, Judianne insecure about her image…etc)

  • I will then re-read a line from Tyrone’s response to Judianne on page 64 and have the students quick write a response to the question. ““Do you think girls, and guys for that matter, ever satisfied with the way they look? Why or Why not?”(give students 3 min) Exchange answers and discuss.



20 min

Guided Practice:

  • As a class, we will read an article about teen body image. We will also discuss the positive and negative effects of the media on young adults.

  • Students will need to answer a few questions on the article and share.




8 min

Independent Practice

  • Students will take turns reading the paragraphs




Closure

  • Reflection: Name one character and the body image issue he or she faces.


1 min



Special notes and Reminders to myself

-Mind the time

Materials and Resources needed

-PP presentation

-Worksheets on article

-Quick Write Journals

Accommodations for Students with Special Needs

Assessment of Student Learning

-Students participation will be taken into account.

-Daily DIN is 5 points

Reflection on or Evaluation of Lesson

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