Professor Degnan’s project will use genomic approaches on marine organisms such as sea sponges to gain the most fundamental insights into multicellular life, including human diseases and cancer whose origins can be traced back to ancient and simple marine animals




НазваProfessor Degnan’s project will use genomic approaches on marine organisms such as sea sponges to gain the most fundamental insights into multicellular life, including human diseases and cancer whose origins can be traced back to ancient and simple marine animals
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Media contacts

For project information, contact Australian Laureate Fellow

Professor Peter Hall — 03 8344 9682 (from 6 August 2011), or halpstat@ms.unimelb.edu.au


For Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme information, contact the ARC

0412 623 056 or Communications@arc.gov.au


ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR PHILIP BLAND


Meteorite fireballs - illuminating the origins of the solar system


Current Organisation Imperial College London, UK

Administering Organisation Curtin University of Technology

Primary research field Geology

National Research Priority Frontier Technologies for Building and Transforming Australian Industries


Associate Professor Bland is currently at Imperial College London, UK, and an Adjunct Professor at Curtin University of Technology. Associate Professor Bland’s research contributions in planetary science are broadly based, but his primary interest is in understanding the origin and early evolution of the solar system through analysis of primitive meteorites; and studies of asteroid and cometary impacts. He applies geological concepts to the study of meteorites.


Associate Professor Bland’s project will investigate meteorites. Meteorites are ancient rocks that contain a record of what conditions were like when the solar system was young. To understand that record he will need to discover where they come from. Associate Professor Bland’s project will deliver these data, providing a template to understand how our planetary system came into being.


Associate Professor Bland was awarded his PhD in 1995 in the field of Planetary Science from the Open University, Milton Keyes, UK. Since obtaining his PhD Associate Professor Bland has held a Royal Society University Research Fellowship, an 8-year award which he transferred to Imperial College London in 2002.


Associate Professor Bland sits on several panels of the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council. He has published his research findings in journals such as Science, Nature, Nature Geoscience, and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Associate Professor Bland been the recipient of several awards and fellowships including; Royal Society Overseas Research Fellowship hosted by the Western Australian Museum, Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council Postdoctoral Research Fellowship hosted by Natural History Museum (London), Antarctic Service medal of the US Navy, and the Royal Society University Research Fellowship. He has been awarded the Imperial College London research excellence award in 2005 and again in 2006. Associate Professor Bland has also had an asteroid named after him in honour of his various contributions to planetary science.

Media contacts

For project information, contact Australian Laureate Fellow

Associate Professor Philip Bland — +44 7980 221 556 (mobile) or +44 207 594 6431


For Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme information, contact the ARC

0412 623 056 or Communications@arc.gov.au


PROFESSOR PIPPA NORRIS

Recipient of 2011 Kathleen Fitzpatrick Australian Laureate Fellowship


Making democratic governance work


Current Organisation Harvard University, USA

Administering Organisation The University of Sydney

Primary research field Political Science

National Research Priority Safeguarding Australia


Professor Pippa Norris is the McGuire Lecturer in Comparative Politics at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, USA. She is also a Visiting Professor at The University of Sydney’s Department of Government and International Relations. Professor Norris is awarded the inaugural 2011 Kathleen Fitzpatrick Australian Laureate Fellowship in recognition of her role in the humanities and social sciences. This provides additional funding for mentoring and recognition of excellence for women in these disciplines. A well-known public speaker and author of almost forty books, her research in comparative politics examines democratic institutions and culture, public opinion and elections, gender politics, and political communications.


For the Laureate project, she aims to deepen and advance understanding of the impact of democratic governance upon prosperity, welfare and peace in countries around the world since the late twentieth century. The third wave of democratization has transformed regimes around the globe and the research will seek to establish whether this process has in turn generated concrete benefits in human development.


As part of the Kathleen Fitzpatrick fellowship, she also plans to run workshops and networking events aimed at encouraging early-career women researchers to stay in academia, and also encourage research on gender equality in elected office.


Professor Norris has received numerous awards including the 2011 Johan Skytte Prize in Political Science (with Ronald Inglehart) for her contribution to political science, the APSA Doris A. Graber Award for the best book published in political communications, the Independent Sector’s Virginia A. Hodgkinson research prize, and the Outstanding Professional Achievement Award from the Midwest Political Science Association Women’s Caucus. Professor Norris has also served as the Director of the Democratic Governance Group at the United Nations Development Programme in New York and as an expert consultant for many international bodies, including UNESCO, NDI, the Council of Europe, International IDEA, the World Bank, the National Endowment for Democracy, and the UK Electoral Commission.


Media contacts

For project information, contact Australian Laureate Fellow

Professor Pippa Norris — 0451 651 014, Pippa_Norris@Harvard.edu or www.pippanorris.com


For Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme information, contact the ARC

0412 623 056 or Communications@arc.gov.au


PROFESSOR S. ALEXANDER HASLAM


Responding to the challenges of identity change: An advanced social identity approach to issues of leadership, health and well-being


Current Organisation University of Exeter, UK

Administering Organisation The University of Queensland

Primary research field Psychology

National Research Priority Promoting and Maintaining Good Health


Professor Alex Haslam is currently Professor of Social and Organisational Psychology at the University of Exeter, UK. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences. His research interests centre on issues of self and identity as applied to topics of leadership, motivation, communication, decision-making, negotiation, productivity, collective action, space management, gender, stress, stereotyping and prejudice.


Professor Haslam’s project aims to develop an integrated framework for understanding how changes to identity that are associated with the changing fabric of the modern world impact on Australians' health and well-being. The project will develop and test strategies for tackling these challenges and minimising their negative consequences.


Professor Haslam was awarded his PhD in Psychology from Macquarie University in 1991. He held appointments at The Australian National University and The University of Sydney before moving to the University of Exeter, UK. Professor Haslam has published numerous books, the latest being The New Psychology of Leadership (2011, Psychology Press). He has also published articles in journals such as Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, European Journal of Social Psychology, Academy of Management Review and the Journal of Applied Psychology. He is on the editorial boards of several journals including British Journal of Management, British Journal of Social Psychology, European Journal of Social Psychology, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, and Scientific American Mind. Professor Haslam is a former President of the Psychology Section of the British Science Association.


Professor Haslam has received several awards including the Kurt Lewin award from the European Association of Experimental Social Psychology for his outstanding contribution to research in social psychology and the British Psychological Society Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Psychology. He is currently a Fellow of several scientific bodies including the Society of Experimental Social Psychology, the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, and the Association for Psychological Science.


Media contacts

For project information, contact Australian Laureate Fellow

Professor S. Alexander Haslam — 00 44 1392 724 618


For Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme information, contact the ARC

0412 623 056 or Communications@arc.gov.au


PROFESSOR STUART WYITHE


Distant horizons: understanding the first galaxies in the Universe


Current Organisation The University of Melbourne

Administering Organisation The University of Melbourne

Primary research field Astronomical and Space Sciences

National Research Priority Frontier Technologies for Building and Transforming Australian Industries


Professor Stuart Wyithe is a Professor in the School of Physics at The University of Melbourne. His research interests include quasar formation and re-ionisation in the early universe, red-shifted 21cm cosmology, black holes, and gravitational lensing. His overall research focus is on the evolution of the earliest galaxies and how this evolution may be studied with the next generation of telescopes.


Professor Wyithe’s project aims to make a comprehensive study of the formation of the first galaxies, and provide answers to the questions of how and when the first generation of galaxies formed, what they looked like and what role they played in the evolution of the Universe.


Professor Wyithe was awarded his PhD from The University of Melbourne in 2001. He worked as a Hubble Fellow at Harvard University before returning to Australia in 2002. Since 2002 Professor Wyithe has been employed in various positions at The University of Melbourne where in 2010 he was appointed Professor in the School of Physics. In 2007 Professor Wyithe received an Australian Research Council Queen Elizabeth II Fellowship. He has also held visiting positions at Princeton University, USA.


Professor Wyithe has received several awards including The University of Melbourne's 2006 Woodward Medal for Science and Technology, the 2008 Edgeworth David Medal from the Royal Society of NSW and the 2009 Pawsey Medal for physics from the Australian Academy of Science for his contribution to cosmology. Professor Wyithe has published extensively in international journals including Nature, Physical Review Letters, Annual Reviews of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Journal of Cosmology and Particle Physics, the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Astrophysical Journal and Astrobiology. He is also a member of the editorial board of the Publications of the Astronomical Society of Australia. He is a member of the Australian Academy of Science’s National Committee for Astronomy.


Media contacts

For project information, contact Australian Laureate Fellow

Professor Stuart Wyithe — 0430 044 841


For Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme information, contact the ARC

0412 623 056 or Communications@arc.gov.au


PROFESSOR WARWICK ANDERSON


Southern racial conceptions: comparative histories and contemporary legacies


Current Organisation The University of Sydney

Administering Organisation The University of Sydney

Primary research field Historical Studies

National Research Priority Safeguarding Australia


Professor Warwick Anderson is a Professorial Research Fellow in the Department of History and the Centre for Values, Ethics, and the Law in Medicine at The University of Sydney. He also has an affiliation with the Unit for History and Philosophy of Science at Sydney and is an Honorary Professorial Fellow of the Centre for Health and Society at The University of Melbourne. As an historian of biology, medicine and public health, Professor Anderson is especially interested in ideas about race, human difference, and citizenship in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.


Professor Anderson’s project aims to reveal intense scientific debate about what it meant to be human in the southern hemisphere during the twentieth century, placing Australian racial thought in a new context. Through comparative study, it shows the distinctive character and scope of racial ideas in southern settler societies, and assesses their global impact.


A medical doctor, Professor Anderson was awarded his PhD in 1992 in the field of History and Sociology of Science from the University of Pennsylvania, USA. Before moving to Sydney, Professor Anderson has held appointments at Harvard University, the University of Melbourne, the University of California (Berkeley and San Francisco) and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has also been a Visiting Professor at Harvard University and a Wellcome Senior Visiting Professor at the University of Manchester, UK.


Professor Anderson has received numerous awards including the Ludwik Fleck Prize from the Society for Social Studies of Science in 2010, the William H. Welch Medal from the American Association of the History of Medicine in 2010 and the NSW Premier’s General History Prize in 2009. He was the Frederick Burkhardt Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University during 2005-06 and also received a fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation for 2007-08. He has held editorial responsibilities for journals such as East Asian Science and Technology Studies Journal, Postcolonial Studies, Medical History, Health and History and the Bulletin of the History of Medicine. Professor Anderson has also served on the council of the American Association for the History of Medicine.


Media contacts

For project information, contact Australian Laureate Fellow

Professor Warwick Andersen — 0428 723 912


For Australian Laureate Fellowships scheme information, contact the ARC

0412 623 056 or Communications@arc.gov.au





Telephone: 02 6287 6600 | Fax: 02 6287 6601 | Web: www.arc.gov.au

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