Story Telling has been a valued skill in human history, providing both entertainment and education. Much of our knowledge of the early beliefs of civilization comes to us from the voices of Bards, Poets, Skalds and Story Tellers long departed




НазваStory Telling has been a valued skill in human history, providing both entertainment and education. Much of our knowledge of the early beliefs of civilization comes to us from the voices of Bards, Poets, Skalds and Story Tellers long departed
старонка2/114
Дата канвертавання02.12.2012
Памер4.14 Mb.
ТыпДокументы
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   114

III.Composition II Course Syllabus


ENG. 1302 - Spring 2011

colorlogo_district


Professor: Jimmy Stephens, M.S., M.Ed.

Email: Jimmy@Stephens.org / jstephe1@AustinCC.edu

Mailbox: Library

Office Hours: As scheduled

Course Hours: M & W 7:45AM – 9:00AM

Prerequisite


Enrollment in ENGL 1302 requires credit for ENGL 1301, or its equivalent, with at least a grade of “C.” Instructor will verify.

Course Description


ENGLISH 1302 is a continuation of English 1301 with emphasis on analysis of readings in prose fiction. Students will use literary elements to interpret short fiction.

Course Objectives


The goals of Composition II are to promote

Critical thinking, reading, and writing within an intercultural context;

Clear, coherent, confident, and effective communication;

Collaborative writing and learning;

Literary analysis.

Course Outcomes


Upon completion of English 1302, students should be able to

Think, read, and write critically;

Effectively use referential (interpretive/analytical) writing;

Critically analyze fiction;

Appreciate and understand how the elements of fiction work together.


Requirements


This course will focus on seven elements of fiction: central idea, character, conflict, point of view, setting, language, and tone. These elements will be incorporated into five to seven writing assignments, varying in length from 200-1000 words (for a minimum total of 2500 words) and using either a cumulative or single-element approach. To qualify for the Departmental Exam, in at least one paper students must demonstrate their mastery of MLA style for documentation by using parenthetical documentation and providing a list of works cited that contains at least one source other than the primary source.

In addition, all TEKS will be covered as required by the state.


High School Rules and Responsibilities

All high school rules and responsibilities are in full force. Absences and grades will be reported to school administration.


Use of Cameras and Recording Devices

Use of recording devices, including camera phones and tape recorders, is prohibited in classrooms, laboratories, faculty offices, and other locations where instruction, tutoring, or testing occurs. These devices are also not allowed to be used in campus restrooms. Students with disabilities who need to use a recording device as a reasonable accommodation should

contact the Office for Students with Disabilities for information regarding reasonable accommodations.


Student Freedom of Expression

Each student is strongly encouraged to participate in class. In any classroom situation that includes discussion and critical thinking, there are bound to be many differing viewpoints. These differences enhance the learning experience and create an atmosphere where students and instructors alike will be encouraged to think and learn. On sensitive and volatile topics, students may sometimes disagree not only with each other but also with the instructor. It is expected that faculty and students will respect the views of others when expressed in classroom discussions.


Participation and Preparation

In addition to the four papers, the department exam, and the “A” and “B” papers, students are expected to come to class prepared with all homework assignments and participate in all class work during class time. Each class day, students will be assessed a checkmark for preparation and a checkmark for participation. In order to qualify to submit the “A” paper, students must have at minimum a 90% participation and preparation grade. In order to qualify to submit the “B” paper, students must have at minimum an 80% participation and preparation grade.


Preparation grades will include but are not limited to the following:

  • Reading the assigned story for the day

  • Completing the assigned reading response for the day

  • Bringing to class rough drafts of papers on peer editing days

  • Bringing to class all writing practice assignments

  • Bringing the assigned textbooks to class


Participation grades will include but are not limited to the following:

  • Attending class

  • Participating in class discussions

  • Reading in-class assignments

  • Participating in in-class writing assignments

  • Taking in-class quizzes and self-assessments

  • Sharing written work with other students

  • Peer editing other student’s work

  • Participating in the start of class and “exit pass” activities


Quizzes and reading responses will only be given during class. No make-up quizzes will be given, and students arriving after the quiz begins or leaving before it is given forfeit their right to take the quiz.


Important Calendar Dates

(Subject to Change)

January 19 First Day of Class

February 21 Holiday

February 9 Peer Edit Paper #1

March 2 Peer Edit Paper #2

March 14, 16 Spring Break (no class)

March 23 Peer Edit Paper #3

April 13 Peer Edit Paper #4

April 25 Withdraw Deadline

May 9 Last Day of Class



Required Textbooks

Charters, Ann. The Story and Its Writer. 8th ed. Boston: Bedford, 2010.

ISBN-10: 0312596235

ISBN-13: 978-0312596231


Hacker, Diana. The Bedford Handbook. 8th ed. Boston: Bedford, 2009.

(Be sure it is the 2009 update.)

ISBN-10: 0312652690

ISBN-13: 978-0312652692


A Note on Textbook Availability: I cannot postpone the readings. It is your responsibility to purchase the required texts as quickly as possible; if you cannot find the textbook at the RCC bookstore, I suggest that you check other ACC bookstores, as well as Bevo's and other college book retailers in Austin.


Grading

I will use the following marks for grading essays: Accept/Edit/Revise/Rewrite


ACCEPTED!: the paper fulfills the objectives of the assignment and is relatively free of grammatical, spelling, and punctuation errors.

EDIT: the paper fulfills the objectives of the assignment but contains errors. You must

avoid similar errors in subsequent papers in order to progress in the course.

REVISE: the paper needs improvement in style, organization, or development.


REWRITE!: the paper does not fulfill the objectives of the assignment.


"B" Requirement: Write an essay according to guidelines provided by your instructor. Minimum length: 1000 words. Your instructor may provide an alternative assignment. The “B” paper will be evaluated “Accept” or “Rewrite” only.


"A" PAPER: Following guidelines provided by your instructor, write an essay using two or more sources on a similar topic. Minimum length: 1000 words. MLA Documentation required. The “A” paper will be evaluated “Accept” or “Rewrite” only.


Students must receive “Accepted” on six essays to be eligible to receive a permit for taking the Departmental Exam. Additional assignments are required for the grades of “B” and “A.”


Your final grade will be determined by the grade level you complete. Each paper will be marked "ACCEPTED," "EDIT," "REVISE," or "REWRITE." (You may submit only one paper at a time; when one is ACCEPTED, you may submit the next one.) In addition, compliance with your instructor's point system for deadlines and activities may determine your eligibility for a grade of "B" or "A."


The Departmental Exam

The Departmental Exam will be taken under supervision in the Testing Center. Given a selection to read, you will write an interpretive essay of at least 750 words analyzing the selection. This essay will be evaluated "ACCEPTED" or "RETEST" only. If you do not pass on the first try, you may retest twice. Your essay must include a summary, analysis, and evaluation and must demonstrate the following

• coherence, critical thinking, and an understanding of the selection's thesis,

purpose(s), and method(s) of organization;

• adherence to stylistic, grammatical, and mechanical conventions


I will establish deadlines by which you must complete a specific number of assignments or be subject to WITHDRAWAL from the course. It is your responsibility to know whether your instructor will withdraw you if you do not meet such deadlines.

NOTE

You must provide your instructor with a Composition II File Folder (available in the ACC bookstores) for your papers. Your instructor will keep your folder for one semester following your enrollment. You are responsible for making copies of any papers you want to keep for your files.

Learning Lab Policy for “B” and “A” Papers

Departmental policy allows students to receive only very general assistance writing “B” and “A” papers in Composition I and II. Examples of such assistance include pre-writing activities and review of writing principles and of grammar and documentation conventions in response to student questions. In addition, individual faculty are free to prohibit students from seeking specific kinds of or any assistance on the “B” and “A” papers and may do so by sending a memo to the learning labs and by stipulating the restriction in class syllabi.


Scholastic Dishonesty

Acts prohibited by the College for which discipline may be administered include scholastic dishonesty, including but not limited to cheating on an exam or quiz, plagiarizing, and unauthorized collaboration with another in preparing outside work. Academic work submitted by students shall be the result of their thought, research, or self-expression. Academic work is defined as, but not limited to tests, quizzes, whether taken electronically or on paper; projects, either individual or group; classroom presentations, and homework' (Student Handbook).

7699_writing_cartoon


I will not tolerate any form of academic dishonesty. Violation of ACC rules against the above will result in the filing of a formal complaint with the College, dismissal from this course, and a final grade of F.


Students with Disabilities

Each ACC campus offers support services for students with documented physical or psychological disabilities. Students with disabilities must request reasonable accommodations through the Office for Students with Disabilities on the campus where they expect to take the majority of their classes. Students are encouraged to do this three weeks before the start of the semester' (Student Handbook).


Phones, Laptops, etc.

Turn off and secure all electronic devices — laptop computers, cellphones, Blackberries, pagers, etc. - in purse, pocket, or backpack upon entering the classroom. Regarding the use of laptops, it has been my experience that laptops are a distraction to other students. I encourage the taking of notes in ENGL 1302 (in fact, careful note-taking is crucial to success in this course), but please take your notes by hand. You can always type them up after class. It's a useful review technique.


Contacting the Instructor

I am available both before and after class, and as scheduled. Outside of office hours, you can contact me via voicemail or email. In either case I will respond within 24 hours. I am happy to answer questions about course policies and assignments, but read the course material first.


Email Etiquette

Should you have need to email me, make sure that your message has a clear subject line including the course number, your name, and the reason for your email. Emails with blank subject lines or vague subjects ("Hi!" or "question," to cite two examples) are indistinguishable from spam and will go into the trash unread, as will emails informing me that you were absent from class and asking "did I miss anything?"(Yes, you did. Check the syllabus.)

Since I'm your English instructor, humor me and strive for clear and appropriate English (Edited American English) in your email communications.


Classroom Etiquette

Gentlemen, please remove your hat or cap while in the classroom. Ladies, personal grooming (hair, makeup, etc.) in class is not appropriate.


Attendance/Tardiness Policy

I will take roll every day at the beginning of class. If you come in after the roll is called, it is your responsibility to inform me of your presence so that I may mark you tardy rather than absent (but please wait until after class). Two late arrivals will count as one absence. Students with more than five absences (other than work days) will be ineligible to receive a final grade higher than C; I will not give warnings, so keep track of your attendance. The majority of the information in this course comes from lecture and handouts, so regular and punctual attendance is vital to your success. You are responsible for information covered in class, whether you were present or not.

Please note that attendance is required on days marked CONFERENCE DAY. On these days I will set aside time for individual consultation on assignments, etc. On days marked WORK DAY, we will not meet as a class, but I will be available for consultation, submissions, etc.


Reading Assignments/Quizzes

Familiarize yourself with this syllabus, consult it daily, and keep up with the readings outlined in the schedule; I may give reading quizzes on the course material. These quizzes will be given at the beginning of class, and cannot be made up.


Writing Assignment Due Dates

Unless otherwise indicated all assignments are due on the dates given in the course schedule. I will return papers to you on the following class day. You must return edits, revisions, and rewrites to me by the next class, accompanied by the original essay. I cannot accept multiple submissions

Your previous essay must be accepted before you will be allowed submit the next assignment!


Format and Presentation

All essays submitted for this course must conform to Modern Language Association (MLA) format — I require that your essays be typewritten and consistently double-spaced, with standard margins. All essays must be stapled. Please use Courier New font (12-point). For more information and a sample page, see "Format for Essays" below. I will return improperly formatted, unstapled, or poorly printed submissions unevaluated.


Withdrawal Policy

I do not withdraw students for any reason. If you decide that you no longer wish to attend the course, you must fill out a withdrawal form and submit it to Admissions and Records. The final day to withdraw is posted on the college web site. After that date, you cannot withdraw from the course.


The Texas Legislature has recently passed a bill that new ACC students should be aware of. According to a new state law, students enrolling for the first time in Fall 2007 or later at any Texas college or university may not withdraw (receive a W) from more than six courses during their undergraduate college career. Students are encouraged to select courses carefully, and contact an advisor or counselor for assistance.


Incompletes

I do not issue incompletes in ENGL 1302.



Format for Essays


All essays submitted for this class should be typewritten and consistently double-spaced, and must conform to standard Modern Language Association format.

  • Use 12-point Courier New (or Courier, if Courier New isn't available on your computer) for all essays, and consistently double-space your essay.

  • On the first page only, in the upper left hand corner, place your name, the course number (ENGL 1302), my name, the number of the essay (Essay 1, Essay 2, whatever, and the date. On all pages, place your last name and the page number in the upper right-hand corner, one-half inch from the top of the page; use the header command in MS Word.)

  • Don't forget to give your essay a title - one that gives the reader some idea of what he's in for, and includes the name of the author and title of the story you're writing about (for example, "Taking Care of Grandma"). Skip two spaces and center it.

  • Then skip another two spaces and begin your essay.

  • Once you have printed your essay out, proofread it carefully. Then proofread it again. Make minor corrections neatly in ink. If you find more than one or two errors, correct them and print it out again.

  • See the next page for a model of how your first page should look


Writing Assignment Guidelines and Expectations

In order for a paper to be accepted it must

  • Have a clear thesis statement,

  • Use MLA format and documentation,

  • Follow literary conventions,

  • Be organized effectively,

  • Use ample evidence and support from the primary text,

  • Be reasonable free of grammatical, mechanical, and spelling issues,

  • Use appropriate punctuation.

Avoid common issues:

  • Do not arbitrarily assign meaning.

  • Use quoted material effectively.

  • Remember that analysis is not plot summary.

  • Do not confuse central idea with conflict.

Submitting Papers

All papers must be turned in in hard copy form in the ACC folder. No emailed submissions will be accepted.

Papers will be marked “Accept,” “Edit,” “Revise,” or “Rewrite” with appropriate comments. “A” and “B” papers will only be marked “Accept” or “Rewrite”.

Students who have not turned in paper #4 by the withdraw deadline will be asked to withdraw from the class. Due to the overwhelming number of papers that are often turned in on the withdraw deadline, those students turning in paper #4 for the first time on this day may not get the paper back until the second class day. Since this may jeopardize the student’s ability to turn in B and A papers by the end of the course, students are strongly encouraged to turn in paper #4 before the withdraw deadline.

All papers will be kept by the teacher. Failure to turn in your folder at the end of the semester will negatively affect your grade.


Lady Gaga

ENGL 1302

Professor Stephens

Essay 5: Analysis

May 5, 2011


Persuasion and Pathos in Montville's "Requiem for a Super Featherweight"


Leigh Montville's essay "Requiem for a Super Feather-weight" tells the story of a young man whose life is cut short by a prizefight gone terribly wrong. Montville, a writer for Sports Illustrated, presents the events surrounding the death of 23-year-old Jimmy Garcia as a narration of event (1). It is not immediately clear that the author's purpose is persuasion, but as the story progresses and the reader learns more about what happened to Garcia and the sort of person he was, it becomes obvious that Montville's intent is to argue for the abolition of boxing.

Montville's primary aim of persuasion becomes clear near the end of the essay. He writes that the young man's condition after a title fight at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas "brought easy calls for the abolition of boxing," and adds that "[i]nstead of engaging in that debate," everyone should go inside a hospital room to see the consequences of the sport firsthand.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.


(ed. note: 225 words)



Instructions for Edit, Revision, and Rewrite


If I have marked your essay 'edit,' 'revise,' or 'rewrite,' make sure that you hand in your previous version with the new one (if I ask for an edit and you make corrections on the original, of course, this does not apply). I cannot accept revisions or rewrites unless you attach the original essay. Please note that I do not mark all typos, misspellings, grammatical errors, etc. Rather, I will indicate general problems, mark some examples, and leave it to you to find and correct the rest, so be sure that you correct all instances of a problem. If you do not understand the correction mark, talk with me. If you are not sure what to do, come see me. I'll be glad to go over it with you. (You may also wish to visit the tutoring lab.)

Be sure that you correct all errors. Otherwise, I will return the essay to you for further work.

If I marked your essay 'edit,' make changes neatly and carefully on the original copy. If I request a 'clean copy' edit, please make the changes, print a new copy, and then hand both essays in together (stapled, please, with the new version on top).

If I marked your essay 'revise,' note my comments and corrections, go through the essay carefully, make the changes I have requested (being careful not to introduce new errors), and print a new copy. Staple the original to your revision (again, new version on top) and hand them in together.

If the essay receives 'rewrite,' it's an indication that it suffers from serious problems — too-frequent mechanical errors, structural problems, etc. Note my written comments and corrections, talk with me about it, then put the original aside and start over, making sure that you follow my instructions carefully.

When you make corrections and/or revisions, please follow these guidelines:

  • Correct misspelled words; do not simply delete the word or substitute a new one you happen to know how to spell. Similarly, do not correct grammar errors, etc., by rewriting the passage to eliminate the error. For example, if you have a problem with subject-verb agreement, make sure that you understand the problem, and then correct it; do not revise the sentence to avoid the necessity of correcting the error.

  • If I write 'awk' (awkward), 'unclear,' or 'ungr' (ungrammatical) next to a sentence or passage, be sure that you rewrite or revise it.

  • Avoid making new mistakes in the process of revision. Learn from your errors, and take that knowledge forward into the next project.

  • If you have a question, do not hesitate to ask me for clarification. I also urge you to take advantage of the expert help available in the ACC Tutoring Lab.

  • Finally, keep in mind that, in accordance with English Department policy, I cannot consider your next essay until the previous one has been accepted.

How Many Pages is 1,000 Words?

Some students are concerned with the number of pages they are required to write in an essay. These students are not really fond of writing articles. They want to complete an essay as quickly as possible. But what if your teacher asks you to write an essay in 1000 words? You will be asking how ‘many pages is 1000 words should be produced?’
You have to understand that essay writing is not all about the number of words or the number of pages. The more important thing is the article has a specific goal of writing and it entices audience to read it. The number of words and page requirements are simply guidelines for the class to use. These are instructor based rules that he or she may need to test. If you are curious how 1000 words will fit in an essay, let us give you some info about how many pages is 1000 words.
The number of pages of an essay will be influenced not by the number of words but by the format and layout. One example is the spacing of the sentences. There are single spaced and double spaced essays. Usually, a single spaced essay page will contain at least 500 words. This is a general average. So if you have a double spaced essay, then there will be two pages per 500 words. Increasing the number further will give you four pages in 1000 words.
Another factor to consider is the inclusion of miscellaneous pages. The number of pages will increase if you will add a cover page, table of contents and bibliography page. You may also add an illustration or diagram page. Now you know how many pages is 1000 words you can start formatting your essay.

This article originally appeared on http://essay-blog.com/college-essays/how-many-pages-is-1000-words


English 1302

Course Outline


  1. Unit One: Research Skills

    1. Learning Outcomes: Upon successful completion of the lesson, the student will be able to write a series of compositions in standard MLA format.

      1. Develop the correct MLA format for noting reference materials.

      2. Employ direct quotes, paraphrases, and summaries, from sources for notes.

    2. Learning Activities:

      1. Classroom lecture/discussion

      2. Reading Assignments : Handouts

    3. Unit Outline:

      1. Review paper requirements

      2. Review MLA standards

  2. Unit Two: Literary Analysis

    1. Learning Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will use the skills developed to write a series of short analytical compositions.

    2. Learning Activities:

      1. Classroom lecture/discussion

      2. Reading Assignments : Handouts

    3. Unit Outline:

      1. Discuss literary analysis and the terms associated with it

      2. Read examples of literary analysis from other students

      3. Read examples of literary analysis from professionals

  3. Unit Three: The Short Story

    1. Learning Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will

      1. Explain the major characteristics of modern fiction as they apply to the short story.

      2. Write an effective 300 word expository essay analyzing one or more of the short stories studied, demonstrating detailed understanding of the characteristics of short fiction as assigned.

    2. Learning Activities:

      1. Classroom lecture/discussion

      2. Reading Assignments

      3. Writing Assignments

    3. Unit Outline:

      1. Introduction to Short Story

        1. Plot

        2. Conflict

        3. Characterization

        4. Setting

        5. Point of View

        6. Symbolism

        7. Theme

      2. Analysis and interpretation of several short stories

      3. Short Story Exam (optional)

      4. Short Story Essay

      5. The Stories

        1. Stories for Class Discussion

          1. Connell – “The Most Dangerous Game” - Conflict

          2. Greene – “The Destructors” - Setting

          3. Brush – “The Birthday Party” - Conflict

          4. Cheever – “The Swimmer” – Point of View

          5. Faulkner – “A Rose for Emily” - Symbolism

          6. Gilman – “The Yellow Wallpaper”

          7. Gordimer – “Once Upon a Time”

          8. Hauptmann - “Bahnwärter Thiel” - Characterization

          9. Joyce – “The Dead”

          10. Joyce – “Eveline” - Character

          11. Mansfield – “Miss Brill” - Symbolism

          12. Marquez – “A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings”

          13. O’Connor – “The Drunkard”

          14. Salinger – “A Perfect Day for Bananafish”

          15. Updike – “A&P”

        2. Stories for Compositions

          1. Vonnegut - “Harrison Bergeron”

          2. Nolan - “Memento Mori”

          3. Kafka - “Metamorphosis”

          1. Baldwin - “Sonny’s Blues”

          2. Twain - “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County”

          3. Cisneros - “The House on Mango Street”

          4. Jackson - “The Lottery”

          5. Hurst - “The Scarlet Ibis”

          6. O'Brien - “The Things They Carried”

          7. Bradbury - “The Utterly Perfect Murder”

          8. Hawthorne - “Young Goodman Brown”

  1. Unit Four: The Novel

    1. Learning Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will

      1. Explore the differences and similarities of the two types of narrative fiction—the short story and the novel.

      2. Explain the major elements of fiction and how they apply to the novel.

    2. Write an effective 300 word expository essay analyzing the novel read in class demonstrating understanding of the characteristics of the novel form.

    3. Learning Activities:

      1. Classroom lecture/Discussion

      2. Reading Assignments

    4. Unit Outline:

      1. Review of fictional elements and narrative

      2. Discussion of differences and similarities of the short story and the novel

      3. In-class discussion and analysis of the novel selected by the instructor or by the student with instructor approval

      4. In-class exam (optional)

      5. Novel essay

  2. Unit Five: Drama

    1. Learning Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will

      1. Explain the major elements of drama.

      2. Write an effective 300 word expository essay analyzing the drama discussed in class.

    2. Learning Activities:

      1. Classroom lecture/discussion

      2. Reading assignment: Macbeth

    3. Unit Outline:

      1. An introduction to drama

        1. The major elements of drama

          1. Plot

          2. Conflict

          3. Characterization

          4. Dialogue

          5. Setting

          6. Theme

          7. Spectacle

        2. A brief history of the two major types of drama

          1. Comedy

          2. Tragedy

          3. In-class discussion and interpretation of at least one drama

          4. Drama exam (optional)

          5. Drama essay English

      2. The Play – Macbeth by William Shakespeare

  3. Unit Six: Poetry

    1. Unit Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will

      1. Be able to differentiate between poetry and non-poetry

      2. Explain the major characteristics of poetry as well as the major types of poetry.

      3. Analyze and interpret a variety of poems.

      4. Write and effective 300 word expository essay interpreting a poem selected by the instructor.

    2. Learning Activities:

      1. Classroom lecture/discussion

      2. Reading Assignments

    3. Unit Outline:

      1. Introduction to Poetry

        1. The major characteristics of poetry

          1. Theme

          2. Word choice

          3. Imagery and figurative language

          4. Sound

        2. The forms of poetry

          1. Closed forms

          2. Open forms

          3. In-class discussion of a variety of selected poems

          4. In-class exam (optional)

          5. Poetry essay



Composition Assignments

Paper #1: Conflict and Setting

  1. Choose from one of the following stories: “The Scarlet Ibis” or “Harrison Bergeron.”

  2. Write a well-developed analytical essay focusing on either conflict or setting. Clearly identify the central idea of the story in the thesis statement. Explain what the conflict or the setting contributes to the central idea and support this conclusion with examples from the story. You may choose to analyze both elements. If you do so, you must describe their relationship to each other as well as their contribution to the central idea.

Minimum length: 300 words


Paper #2: Character and Point of View

  1. Choose from one of the following short stories: “The Utterly Perfect Murder”, “The House on Mango Street”, “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County”, or “Memento Mori.”

  2. Write a well-developed analytical essay focusing on either character or point of view. Clearly identify the central idea of the story in the thesis statement. Explain what the characterization or the point of view contributes to the central idea and support this conclusion with examples from the story. You may choose to analyze both elements. If you do so, you must describe their relationship to each other as well as their contribution to the central idea.

Minimum length: 300 words


Paper #3: Language and Tone

  1. Choose from one of the following short stories: “The Lottery” or “The Things They Carried.”

  2. Write a well-developed analytical essay focusing on either language or tone. Clearly identify the central idea of the story in the thesis statement. Explain what the language or the tone contributes to the central idea and support this conclusion with examples from the story. You may choose to analyze both elements. If you do so, you must describe their relationship to each other as well as their contribution to the central idea.

Minimum length: 300 words


Paper #4: Analysis of all seven elements

  1. Choose from one of the following short stories: “Metamorphosis”, “Sonny’s Blues”, or “Young Goodman Brown.”

  2. Write a well-developed analytical essay that demonstrates how the conflict, setting, characterization, point of view, language, and tone each contributes to the central idea (stated in the thesis statement). Use examples from the story to support your discussion of each element. Include at least one quote or paraphrase of a professional criticism to support your conclusions.

  3. Include a works cited (on a separate page) with all of the primary and secondary sources listed in MLA format. Parenthetical citations must be used for all secondary sources.

Minimum length: 900 words


B” Paper: Author Study

Write a well-developed analytical essay that focuses on how an author uses an element in different short stories. Compare and contrast the uses of the element in different stories by the same author. Identify commonalities that mark an author’s style and support with examples from the stories. Choices for author studies will be given in April.

Minimum length: 1000 words.


A” Paper: Compare and Contrast

Write a well-developed analytical essay that compares and contrasts thematic elements of two stories. In addition to the analysis and comparison of both central ideas, choose at least three additional elements for comparison. Choices for story pairs will be given in April.

Minimum length: 1000 words


English 1302

First Day of Class

Exit Pass and Syllabus Contract



  1. What is your professor’s email address? ____________________________________________________




  1. How must all papers be formatted? _______________________________________________________




  1. How many papers must be ultimately be accepted in order to receive an “A” in the class?______________




  1. When is the last day to turn in paper #4 for the first time?______________________________________




  1. What percentage of preparation and participation checkmarks must you have in order to be eligible to write an “A” paper? ____________



I ___________________________________________(print your name) acknowledge that I have read the syllabus, and I understand the expectations of the class. I understand the grading system and recognize the importance of turning in my work in a timely manner in order to receive the grade I want. I also understand the importance of arriving to class on time and prepared. According to ACC policy, there are no excused absences. If you must be gone for a school activity, you are still responsible for all assignments for that class. You will be dropped for excessive absences.


___________________________________________________________________ ________________
Signature Date


Optional:


________________________________________________________________________

Email Address


At this time, the grade that I am working towards in this class is a(n) _____________


Things you should know about me. (Use other side if desired).


1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   114

Падобныя:

Story Telling has been a valued skill in human history, providing both entertainment and education. Much of our knowledge of the early beliefs of civilization comes to us from the voices of Bards, Poets, Skalds and Story Tellers long departed iconSequencing and story telling

Story Telling has been a valued skill in human history, providing both entertainment and education. Much of our knowledge of the early beliefs of civilization comes to us from the voices of Bards, Poets, Skalds and Story Tellers long departed iconThis is not just another story about ufos, aliens and alien abductions. This is a true story

Story Telling has been a valued skill in human history, providing both entertainment and education. Much of our knowledge of the early beliefs of civilization comes to us from the voices of Bards, Poets, Skalds and Story Tellers long departed iconThe Mediterranean is filled with a variety of poets and short story writers. From the 1300s-1900s, these authors have spanned an array of topics and themes for

Story Telling has been a valued skill in human history, providing both entertainment and education. Much of our knowledge of the early beliefs of civilization comes to us from the voices of Bards, Poets, Skalds and Story Tellers long departed iconA long journey into the darkness: the story of street kings

Story Telling has been a valued skill in human history, providing both entertainment and education. Much of our knowledge of the early beliefs of civilization comes to us from the voices of Bards, Poets, Skalds and Story Tellers long departed iconLatter days: Part 26 (of 35)-It's the greatest story story ever told. Now, if Cerebus can only get to his writing desk The countdown to issue 300 (March

Story Telling has been a valued skill in human history, providing both entertainment and education. Much of our knowledge of the early beliefs of civilization comes to us from the voices of Bards, Poets, Skalds and Story Tellers long departed iconBangladesh School Sanitation and Hygiene Education: The Story of its Impact on One Village and its School

Story Telling has been a valued skill in human history, providing both entertainment and education. Much of our knowledge of the early beliefs of civilization comes to us from the voices of Bards, Poets, Skalds and Story Tellers long departed iconBasic Education and Employable Skill Training

Story Telling has been a valued skill in human history, providing both entertainment and education. Much of our knowledge of the early beliefs of civilization comes to us from the voices of Bards, Poets, Skalds and Story Tellers long departed iconAdvanced Placement World History is a rigorous full year course covering the history of human experience on the planet. As an equivalent to a college survey

Story Telling has been a valued skill in human history, providing both entertainment and education. Much of our knowledge of the early beliefs of civilization comes to us from the voices of Bards, Poets, Skalds and Story Tellers long departed iconThis is my story

Story Telling has been a valued skill in human history, providing both entertainment and education. Much of our knowledge of the early beliefs of civilization comes to us from the voices of Bards, Poets, Skalds and Story Tellers long departed iconHm 14 The Story

Размесціце кнопку на сваім сайце:
be.convdocs.org


База данных защищена авторским правом ©be.convdocs.org 2012
звярнуцца да адміністрацыі
be.convdocs.org
Галоўная старонка